Jimsonweed / Stechapfel / Kužnjak / Datura / manzana espinosa / Datura / Datura (Datura)

Datura_stramonium_jimson weed

Datura belongs to the classic “witches’ weeds”, along with deadly nightshade, henbane, and Mandrake. Most parts of the plants are toxic, and Datura has a long history of use for causing delirious states and death. It was well known as an essential ingredient of potions and witches’ brews.

In India, it has been referred to as “Poisonous” and as an aphrodisiac. In little measures, it was used in Ayurveda as medicine from ancient times. It is used in rituals and prayers to Shiva. It is also used in Ganesh Chaturthi.

Anthropologists have found that indigenous groups, with a great deal of experience with and detailed knowledge of Datura, have been known to use Datura spiritually (including the Navajo and especially the Havasupai). Again, knowledge of Datura’s properties is necessary to facilitate a healthy experience. Southern Paiute Indians believe Datura can help locate missing objects.

In olden times the flowers and seeds were used in treatments of skin rashes in the face; for internal treatments, it was used for colds, nervous disturbances; it was also used with madness, varying fever sicknesses, tumors, breast infections, skin diseases, asthma, rheumatic pains, swellings, pain relieve at birth and diarrhea.

The plant is assigned a very strong hallucinogenic effect, so that only somebody, “who is so authorized”, can control it.

In many indigenous cultures, it is used as a hallucinogen that allows contact with the spirit world, for recognition of sicknesses and as a youth initiation agent.

The physiological activity expresses itself in fatigue that leads to hallucinatory phase and ends in deep sleep and unconsciousness.

For a good trip chew and eat some seeds or drink about 1 cup of plant tea or less (try microdosing first), to enter the spirit world and a dreamlike visionary state.

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